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Maximum Radiated Emissions Calculator (MR EMC)

Welcome to the beta test site for the Maximum Radiated Emissions Calculator. This calculator determines the maximum possible radiated emissions from various printed circuit board structures. In addition to calculating the radiated emissions directly from the circuit board, it can also calculate the maximum possible radiated emissions from cables and structures connected to the board even when the size and orientation of those structures has not been specified.

The calculator works based on the assumption that everything that is unknown is worst case. For example if you know that there are cables attached to your board, but you don't specify their size or geometry, the calculator assumes that they are resonant at every frequency.

Currently, the calculator evaluates different types of radiation using separate algorithms. Therefore, if you want to know the maximum amount of radiated emissions due to noise on a microstrip trace being radiated directly from the circuit board, you would choose the differential-mode EMI calculator. If you want to know the maximum amount of radiated emissions due to noise on a microstrip trace being radiated by the cables attached to the circuit board, you would choose the common-mode EMI calculator. Eventually, these algorithms will all be able to be run from the same input file making it unnecessary to select a particular radiation mechanism before you start.

 

Two copper plates separated by a dielectric trace and ground plane separated by a dielectric circuit board with attached cable circuit board with two traces; one attached to an external cable
Power-bus EMI Calculator Differential-mode EMI Calculator Common-mode EMI Calculator I/O Coupling EMI Calculator

 

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation I/UCRC for Electromagnetic Compatibility. Any opinions, findings and conclusions or recomendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation (NSF).